Forbidden Loves and Forgotten Legacies

Burnina Sparks sits on a blue velvet couch with grey-black hair, and stack of lesbian books beside her in front of an orchid on the right, and a formal blue jacket and slacks.

One of the most beautiful things about doing my MA on lesbian representation has been gaining a sense of legacy, and an understanding of how historical cultural representations have led us to this point.

Something I’ve been thinking about more and more recently is that intergenerational learning in lesbian communities, and queer communities more broadly, can be hard to come across. Ageism certainly contributes to this reality, as does the erasure of queer histories from mainstream archives and curricula.

It is a privilege to have the opportunity to learn about the history I am researching, but I think that those of us with that privilege have a responsibility to share it until it is accessible to everyone in every generation of queers.

On that note, I made a short video engaging with a film I watched recently (and wish I’d seen sooner) called “Forbidden Loves: The Unashamed Stories of Lesbian Lives.” What does it mean as a dyke living in this generation to sit with the words of someone who came before me?